Cripple Creek Care Center

Cripple Creek Care Center’s 40th Anniversary Invite

Cripple Creek Care Center Employees with Van

Cripple Creek Care Center Employees with CCCC van

On Saturday, September 9th, the Cripple Creek Care Center will be hosting a community celebration to mark their 40th Anniversary.

Beginning at 11am through about 1:30pm, the Center invites community members to join them for food, music, goody handouts, facility tours, ribbon cutting for our new bus, and acknowledgement of individual and business contributions to the success of this District asset.

This will all take place at the Care Center, located at 700 North ‘A’ Street in Cripple Creek.

This is part of our community’s history…and part of our community’s future.

Come and celebrate what community effort and support can accomplish!

OUR HISTORY:

The Cripple Creek Care Center represents the best in community cooperation and involvement.   Though the summers saw tourists passing through, back in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s Cripple Creek and Victor were pretty sleepy and isolated little communities – especially during the winters. The 1970 census recorded a population of 258 for Victor, and 425 for Cripple Creek.

By that time, the medical and hospital services for what was once a booming gold mining district had faded away. What was once St. Nicholas Hospital had become the Hilltop Nursing Home. Even with these limited services, the facility was then too old and out-dated to remain open. It closed in 1972. The community was without any local medical care.

The nearest hospital was almost 50 miles away in Colorado Springs. The route to Colorado Springs was north on Highway 67. Following the old rail route to the District, the highway was even more of a rugged mountain road than it is today. One big challenge was “the tunnel.” Located about half way between Cripple Creek and Divide, the tunnel was one of the last true remnants of the railroad to Cripple Creek. In the 1970’s cars had to pass through it, but could do so only one direction at a time. It tested the patience and courtesy of drivers back then!

Though at this time the population was at its lowest numbers since gold was discovered, local business leaders were determined to provide modern medical services to the area residents and the visitors who were the staple of the summer tourist economy.

Coming together in the truest sense of the word “community,” area residents began planning and fundraising for what many considered an impossible goal.

They started by establishing the operational foundation of the facility. After months of work, on November 10, 1975, the Southwest Teller County Hospital District, a Colorado Title 32 Special District, was officially formed and approved as the governing and management basis for a medical facility.

Three days later, the first Board of Directors organizational meeting was held. The first Board of Directors members for SWTCHD were: Jack Gaffney; Chairman, Muriel Murphy; Secretary & Treasurer, and Wayne Mackin, Theodore H. Mueller, and Gregory Robertson.  The Nursing Home Administrator was Sue Huffman, Doc Denman was the medical director, and Good Samaritan was the management company.

Once the District was formed, planning and fundraising began for the combined medical clinic and nursing home. Nine months later, on August 28, 1976, groundbreaking took place and construction began for the Hilltop Community Health Care Facility.

On June 19, 1977, the dedication ceremony was held and the doors to the A.C. Denman Clinic and the Hilltop Nursing Home were opened.

The nursing home occupied the eastern portion of the building with two main wings/halls offering 60 beds.  The western portion, or clinic area, was separated from the nursing home by double doors and had a three-bed unit for emergency care, an x-ray room, a lab, two exam rooms and two small doctor offices.  The building also had an attached garage and covered ambulance dock.

Now, 40 years later, this facility is still open and serving the District community members. Today, however, it operates under the name “Cripple Creek Care Center” and no longer offers a medical clinic.

Those dreamers and planners who worked so hard more than 40 years ago to bring this to their community would be proud of what it has become today: a 5-star rated 24/7 skilled nursing care facility that serves the needs of the area’s elderly and disabled.

In the past five years, through the governance of the District’s Board of Directors, the Care Center has undergone capital improvements that have completely updated and upgraded the building, landscaping, mechanical infrastructure, residents’ rooms, public and office areas, and service areas such as the kitchen and laundry rooms.

Through the efforts and care of the Administration and staff, the Center maintains a 5-Star rating.

Learn more at www.cc-care.org.

In 2013 the name under which the Special District operated was changed to the Southern Teller County Health Services District. This was done to meet current Colorado Title 32 guidelines, and to better reflect our service area, and the management of the District’s ambulance service.

Through the current Board’s management, the District remains debt free.

Learn more at www.stchsd.org.

From: Cripple Creek Care Center

Playground Partnership with Penrose and CCV

New Playground

New Playground

Penrose-St. Francis Health Services is committed to improving the quality of life where people in our communities live, work and play. With that goal in mind, Penrose-St. Francis partnered with Cripple Creek-Victor School District (CCVSD) to create an outdoor playground at Cripple Creek-Victor Junior/Senior High School.

The project was made possible through a one-year grant from The Colorado Health Foundation of over $126,000. The playground is intended to actively engage students, teachers, parents and community members, who were all involved in the design and development of the playground from the project’s early stages. The school designated approximately 10,000 sq. ft. for the playground, which includes an obstacle and fitness course and a climbing structure.

By improving Cripple Creek’s outdoor play environment, Penrose-St. Francis hopes to make a meaningful impact in the community, which lacks outdoor play equipment for children. The new playground will be accessible to students and teachers during school hours and to community members during non-school hours. The playground was completed just in time for the start of the 2017-2018 school year and celebrated at an inauguration Aug. 14.

The project is perfectly aligned with Penrose-St. Francis’ goal of supporting wellness and improving health outcomes for all youth in the Cripple Creek community. In January 2016, Penrose-St. Francis and CCVSD signed a memorandum of understanding to operate CCVSD’s school-based health center. Students, teachers and the community can improve general wellness by increasing opportunities for active play and recreation.

 

(L-R) Penrose-St. Francis Health Foundation President Josh Bailey, Grants Manager Hannah Watson, VP of Market Partnerships and Network Development Gail Decker, and Dr. Michael Nunley.

Submitted by: Penrose-St. Francis

 

 

 

2017 Salute to American Veterans Rally Road Closures

Salute to American Veterans


From:
Gloria Gates
Events and Tourism Coordinator
City of Cripple Creek

Attached you will find the schedule of events for the Veterans Rally next weekend, August 18th-20th.
The Replica Vietnam Memorial Wall will be in the high school football field.

Road closures as follows:

Thursday, Aug. 17th 6am – Sunday, Aug. 20th 10pm:  Bennett Ave from 1st Street to 3rd Street.

Friday, Aug. 18th 5pm – Sunday, Aug. 20th 8pm:  Bennett Ave from “A” Street to 5th Street.
Friday, Aug. 18th 6pm – Saturday, Aug. 19th 5pm: 1st Street from Masonic to the alley by Community Bank. The bank will be accessible from Warren Ave.

*Courthouse access will be open until 5pm on Friday.

Saturday, Aug. 19th 10am – 1pm:  Bennett Ave from “B” Street to 5th Street and 5th Street from Bennett to Golden. This closure is for the parade and motorcycle procession.

*The closures on the side streets will go to the alleys except on 1st Street, where it will run from Masonic to Carr with an additional closure from Masonic to Community Bank on Saturday.

Please feel free to share this info with anyone who may benefit from receiving it.

Thank you so much!

 

Victor Celebrates The Arts

Victor Celebrates the Arts

Looking for something unique to do on the LABOR DAY WEEKEND? Try VICTOR CELEBRATES THE ARTS! A treat is in store for gamblers, history buffs, art lovers, families, and tourists at the 18h annual en Plein Air art show and sale in Victor. Dozens of artists from around the country gather to capture the lively, authentic 1890’s gold mining community. The magnificent scenery of the Sangre de Christo Range lends inspiration as well.

Hundreds of paintings are created on location within 10 miles of the Victor City Hall during the week prior to Labor Day. Artists will seek out new and interesting sites in Victor as well as Cripple Creek this year. The artists look forward to visiting the numerous shops and casinos who have donated gifts and free passes to be given out at the Artists Reception. A new feature added to the Labor Day Quick Draw, Monday Sept 5 is live music to be played while the artists paint in Wallace Park.

This popular show and sale is at the Elks Hall Ballroom, 3rd and Diamond, Sept. 2-3 , (9-5) and Labor Day, Sept 4 (9-1). The free event opens 9 am. Watch artists paint on Victor streets Aug 18 thru-Sept 1 prior to the show. Additional at events include the BRUSH RUSH timed competition, Sun. Sept 3 9am-noon. The Wallace Park QUICK DRAW and SELL , Mon. Sept. 4, 9am-noon features artists painting vignettes in a timed event (public applause determines the $100 winner). Chuck wagon vittles, live music and bin artwork for sale as well. Colorado gold mining history, antique shops, unique stores, museums and restaurants all add to the fun.

Victor is located 1 hr. west of Colorado Springs, and 5 mi south of Cripple Creek. An invitation to the private PURCHASE PATRON PARTY, Fri. Sept will be sent upon request vctashow@gmail.com . Info at www.victorcelebratesthearts.org 719-689-5836 or 303-781-2643 for information.

Submitted by: Marilyn Fay

S.A.T.U.R.N. – Task Force

S.A.T.U.R.N.
Substance Abuse Threatening Underage Residents Now

A community task force, made up of community members like you, who can make a difference in the lives of our youth.

SATURN Task Force

SATURN Task Force

Teller County is an engaged mountain community that empowers and supports its youth through prevention and education, to promote healthy, thriving individuals and families.

Meetings are free to the public and are held once a month, alternately at Cripple Creek School District Administration Building and Woodland Park School District Administration Building.

Next meeting will be held on July 11, 2017 at Cripple Creek School District Administration Building. All are invited to attend.

Upcoming community youth events: July Fourth Celebrations and Woodland Park Teen Center Activities.

For more information contact : Tami Clark Public Health Program Manager

Communities That Care Facilitator, Teller County Public Health & Environment

 

Schedule of Events for July

Jul 1- Cripple Creek 4th of July at Cripple Creek City Park

Jul 4 – Attend the Old Fashioned 4th of July activities at Memorial Park. Check City website for details!

Jul 6 – Odyssey Curiosity with Ms. Wiley! You’ll make mini marshmallow catapults and have a competition!! 1:00 – 3:00

Jul 7 – Lego Day – Build your best creation and let your imagination go wild!

Jul 11 – Jewelry Making Workshop – Make a necklace or bracelet using jute, rocks, washers and wire! Great for all teens! 1:00 – 3:00

Jul 12 – TAB Meeting – 3:00 – 4:00 – If you’re on the committee, please plan on attending.

Jul 13 – Adopt-A-Spot – Help keep the area around the Teen Center and Memorial Park Clean. Join us at 3:00 to help out.

Jul 14 – Movie Above the Clouds – Activities and Food available before movie starts. Check the Woodland Park Roots Project FB page for details!

Jul 17 – Teen vs. Wild Survival Skills Challenge – $2.00 Do you have what it takes to stay alive in the wild? Join us to find out! 11:30 – 2:00 Meet at the TC at 11:00 to catch the bus!

Jul 18 – Book Club – If you love reading, consider joining our Book Club. We’ve been going for over a year! 4-5

Jul 19 – Odyssey Curiosity with Miss Wiley at the Teen Center. Build a solar oven out of a pizza box! 1:00 – 3:00

Jul 20 – Meet at the TC to walk to the theatre. $5.50 for ticket, popcorn and soda! Great deal!

Jul 25 – Tour a nearby, real Ghost Town! 10:00 – 1:00 Be at the Teen Center at 9:00 to catch the bus. $2.00

Jul 26 – Chill Day at the Teen Center – A day of quiet and relaxation at the Teen Center!

Jul 28 – Laser Tag – Noon – 3:00 – Sign up to play!!

Jul 31 – Keep Woodland Park Beautiful is hosting a BBQ to thank the Teens for all you do!

Stalking crime in Colorado

Understanding Stalking as a Crime in Colorado

Understanding Stalking as a Crime in Colorado
(Guest Post)

Being annoying is not a crime. Neither is bothering someone. But the crime of stalking in Colorado is not about annoyance or bother – it is about fear. It is about creating a sense of danger and emotional distress in the victim by engaging in repeated conduct that involves threats or unwanted communication or contact. Stalking is a serious crime in Colorado, with prosecutors taking a very aggressive approach in such cases.

“Vonnie’s Law”

The reason stalking is prosecuted so vigorously was set forth by Colorado’s legislature when it passed the state’s anti-stalking law, known as “Vonnie’s Law.” The legislature “recognizes the seriousness posed by stalking and adopts the [anti-stalking law] with the goal of encouraging and authorizing effective intervention before stalking can escalate into behavior that has even more serious consequences.”

Stalking, as defined by Colorado law, involves three key elements:

Repeated conduct That involves a credible threat and/or Causes the victim severe emotional distress.

Specifically, Colorado Revised Statutes section 18-3- 602 (1), C.R.S. provides that a person commits stalking if directly, or indirectly through another person, the person knowingly:

Makes a credible threat to another person and, in connection with the threat, repeatedly follows, approaches, contacts, or places under surveillance that person, a member of that person’s immediate family, or someone with whom that person has or has had a continuing relationship; or

Makes a credible threat to another person and, in connection with the threat, repeatedly makes any form of communication with that person, a member of that person’s immediate family, or someone with whom that person has or has had a continuing relationship, regardless of whether a conversation ensues; or

Repeatedly follows, approaches, contacts, places under surveillance, or makes any form of communication with another person, a member of that person’s immediate family, or someone with whom that person has or has had a continuing relationship in a manner that would cause a reasonable person to suffer serious emotional distress and does cause that person, a member of that person’s immediate family, or someone with whom that person has or has had a continuing relationship to suffer serious emotional distress.

It is important to note that a single act – whether it be in the form of physical conduct or communication through email, the phone, or otherwise – cannot constitute stalking.

“Repeated” conduct is an essential element of the crime, and that requires more than one event.

Similarly, for a threat to form the basis of a stalking charge, it must be “credible,” which means that the threat, physical action, or repeated conduct “would cause a reasonable person to be in fear for the person’s safety or the safety of his or her immediate family or of someone with whom the person has or has had a continuing relationship.”

That sense of fear can also lead to a stalking conviction even without a credible threat. If the repeated conduct or communication “would cause a reasonable person to suffer serious emotional distress” and they do in fact suffer such distress, the conduct or communication alone can be the basis of a stalking charge.

Penalties for Felony Stalking in Colorado

If you are facing a Colorado stalking charge, you are also facing the possibility of a lengthy time behind bars. Stalking is both a felony as well as an “extraordinary risk” crime.

A first-time stalking offense is a class 5 felony which can result in a sentence of 1-5 years in Colorado state prison, a mandatory 2-year period of parole, and/or fines of up to $100,000.

A second or subsequent offense, if committed within seven years of a prior stalking conviction, will be prosecuted as a class 4 felony. It is also a class 4 felony if the stalking occurred while the accused was under an injunction, protective order, or other court order which prohibited communication or contact with the victim. Upon conviction for class 4 felony stalking, you could spend between 2-10 years in state prison with mandatory 3-year parole, and/or a fine of between $2,000 and $500,000.

Cyberstalking

In addition to “Vonnie’s Law,” Colorado also has a law specifically designed to address cyberstalking, online harassment, and cyberbullying. Known as “Kiana Arellano’s Law,” the law is named for a 14-year old Colorado high school sophomore and cheerleader who tried to kill herself in 2013 after being cyberbullied by classmates.

Online harassment, cyberstalking, and cyberbullying under “Kiana Arellano’s Law” is usually charged as a class 3 misdemeanor that can result in up to 6 months in jail, and/or a fine of $50-$750 upon conviction. However, online harassment can be charged as a class 1 misdemeanor if the harassment is committed with the intent to intimidate or harass another person because of that person’s actual or perceived race, color, religion, ancestry, or national origin. In such a case, conviction can result in 6 – 18 months in jail and/or a fine of $500-$5,000.

Given the consequences of a Colorado stalking conviction, it is important to contact an experienced Colorado criminal defense attorney as soon as you can. There are numerous defenses that may be available to you, and your lawyer can help assert those defenses, protect your rights, and guide you through this difficult time.

James Newby
Call for Free Consultation (719) 578-3322
Colorado Springs Criminal Defense Attorney

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